Wednesdays 6-7:30 pm
January 31, February 14, February 21
Come to one or all!

These classic films, all acclaimed by critics, introduce us to the diversity of the Sephardic world and to many important issues confronted by Sephardim, including relations with the larger Ashkenazi community and the role of women.

Wednesday, January 31
I LOVE YOU ROSA

Israeli (Hebrew, 1972, 77 minutes)

The backdrop of this film is the Bukharan quarter of Jerusalem in the early 1900s. We meet Rosa, a living, loving anachronism who lives in defiance of the prescribed domestic role of women. Prior to the film, Professor Schneider will provide an overview of the different Sephardi and Mizrachi communities around the world.

 

 

Wednesday, February 14
SALLAH SHABBATI

Israeli (Hebrew, 1965, 110 minutes)

This is the film that propelled the Israeli film industry to first-class status. Sallah is a patriarch among immigrants to Israel from the Arab states in the first years of statehood. They face bureaucracy, racism, and pressure to change their traditional ways. One of the funniest films on celluloid. Professor Schneider will discuss this challenging period of Israeli history.

 

 

Wednesday, February 21
NOVIA QUE TE VEA (LIKE A BRIDE)
Mexican (Spanish and Ladino, 1993, 114 minutes)

We follow three generations of Jewish immigrants to Mexico City as they struggle with the challenges of assimilation. This film was a personal project of one of Mexico’s leading actresses, who wanted to express and share her Jewish roots. Professor Schneider will discuss how Sephardic Jews today attempt to keep their culture alive, mostly in counties to which they have immigrated.

 

ABOUT BARRY SCHNEIDER:

Professor Barry H. Schneider teaches in the Psychology Department of Boston College and is a beloved member of Temple Ohabei Shalom.

Although not Sephardic himself, Professor Schneider has encountered several Sephardic communities: the Romaniot (Greek) Jews of New York, Jews of Turkish origin in Cuba, Moroccan Jews in Israel and New York, and the ancient Jewish communities of Italy. We are excited that Barry has offered to teach this fascinating course at TOS.